Preventative Care

Vets are now permitted to perform some preventative treatments, assessing the risk in each case. 

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Vaccinations – our guidance now says that following a risk assessment both for animal health and welfare and with regard to Covid-19, primary vaccinations and year 1 boosters in dogs and cats could go ahead due to the increased risk of disease outbreak over a longer period of time.

 

Annual leptospirosis vaccination could potentially go ahead due to the zoonotic risk and following local risk assessment. If additional components of the core vaccine are due at the same time, they could also be administered.

 

In addition, our guidance now says that rabbit vaccinations could go ahead due to the seasonal disease risks. Rabies vaccinations could be carried out if required for certification reasons (for example, repatriation of a family overseas)

 

Neutering – our guidance now says that vets should assess the domestic situation in each case. Where neutering is considered essential in the next two months, chemical options should first be considered, if appropriate. Surgical neutering, ideally using low oxygen use anaesthetic protocols, should be carried out only in situations where essential for animal health and welfare or population control during the time period. For example, neutering in cats should be considered if they cannot be kept indoors or if they are in mixed sex pairings/groupings, for population control. Our guidance now says that rabbit neutering could be carried out for population control and preventing aggression, as they should be kept in social groups.

 

 Microchipping – our guidance now says that microchipping could be undertaken if the animal is already in the practice for an essential service.

 

Flea and worm treatments – our guidance now says that treatments could be dispensed in accordance with local disease risks and public health concerns. 

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